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Seizing the Present Moment: One Bead at a Time July 08, 2015 09:07

 

Like clockwork, the first warm July days bring one of my favorite sounds—that spiraling whir of cicadas grinding away the summer in the trees.  Their song is bittersweet for me, reminding me that the summer is passing quickly.  Their jarring, cyclical songs function much like a natural mantra, reminding me to “be present…be present…be present” and to enjoy what’s left of the summer.

Repetition is soothing and comforting. It creates a familiar and recognizable pattern that can offer reassurance when stressed and bring a sense of order to chaos. Everything in the universe is made of vibration, and all sounds create movements of energy. Mantra is a Sanskrit word that means “sound tool.”  A mantra can be a word, phrase, or affirmation that is repeated in the mind, whispered, chanted, or sung in order to set an intention or aid in concentration during meditation practice.  The mantras we use represent the qualities or traits that we wish to embody or to permeate our consciousness.  When used in conjunction with a mala, the practice becomes even more visceral, and each bead is infused with the essence of the mantra.

The most effective mantras are the ones that are simple, significant, easy to remember, and phrased in the positive.  In order for mantras to make a beneficial difference in our lives, they must be repeated often….and believed. 

Example Sanskrit Mantras

  Om—Primordial sound of creation.  Brings us into harmony with the universe

 Shradda—Faith

 Bhakti—Devotion

 Shanti—Peace

 Santośa (pronounced san-tōsha)—Contentment

 Ananda—Bliss

 Moksha—Liberation

 Dharma—Destiny

 Spiritual Mantras

 Om Namah Shivaya—Honors Shiva, the god of transformation

 Om Gum Ganapatayai Namaha—I honor Ganesha, the remover of obstacles.  I ask for blessings and protection.

 So-Hum or Ham—Sah—“I am that” or “That I am.”

 El Shaddai—Hebrew name for God

 Om mani padme hum—invokes blessings of Chenrezig, the embodiment of compassion in Tibetan Buddhist tradition.

 Modern Examples—or Create Your Own Mantra

 Allow

Believe

Receive

Patience

Today, I choose joy.

I am strong, I am confident, I am healthy, and I am well.

I love myself.  I respect myself. I am worthy.

The universe is my source and will provide.

I send you joy.  I send you peace.  I send you health.  I send you love.

 In addition to calming the mind and silencing the incessant mental chatter of that nagging inner critic, reciting, chanting, singing, or simply thinking mantras can have other positive effects on the body:

*stimulates the relaxation response

*lowers heart rate and blood pressure

*stimulates immune function

*increases physical vitality and energy

*alleviates depression by decreasing stress hormones in body

*promotes breath control

*helps synchronize the left and right hemispheres of the brain

*oxygenates the brain through increased blood flow

*calms brainwave activity

*stimulates melatonin production, which can improve sleep quality

   Hearing the cicadas’ collective song of celebration and endurance today inspired me to take my meditation practice outside.  I sat under a white oak tree, mala in hand, and chanted along with the cicadas: “be present…be present… be present…enjoy this moment…this moment…this…moment…of…summer.”